Backbone and Heart

backbone-and-heart.jpg

Our conversations with others, particularly in mentoring, may be characterized by “backbone and heart”.  We share various sides of our own humanity…strengths, vulnerability and caring.

Backbone is being strong.  It is strength of character and modeling that character even in (especially in) difficult situations.  It is saying things that need to be said to push others to be their best (because you care about them).  It is the setting of boundaries.  It is courage under pressure.  It is “being there” even if you don’t want to be.  It is doing the “right” things.

Heart is doing things with care and love (is there really any other way?).  It is kind words.  It is a sharing of feeling and emotion rather than just doing something.  It can be happy or sad but it is definitely supportive.

Backbone and heart belong together and are a balancing of attitudes.  Tough love is an example.  Vulnerability is that magic ingredient that pulls them together and is an important part of the relationship.  Brené Brown defines vulnerability as “uncertainty, risk and emotional exposure.”  Vulnerability enlarges/deepens a relationship by creating a special connectedness.  It takes courage.

Take a look at your conversations and relationships.  Is “backbone and heart” part of them?

Principle-Based Decision Making

Decisions

We make hundreds of decisions per day.  Most are routine and simple such as what clothes do I wear or what to eat for dinner.  A few are more critical such as what car do I buy or what school should my child attend.  These critical decisions require deliberation and a process, particularly if other people are participating in the decision making.

Here is a decision-making process:

  • Clarify the decision to be made by describing/writing the problem or issue.
  • List the alternatives; option development is as important as option analysis.
  • List the decision criteria or principles.
  • Evaluate each decision against the criteria. Set up a simple matrix on paper.
  • Implement and monitor the decision. Did the outcome achieve expectations?

I want to focus on the 3rd bullet point, i.e. listing the criteria or principles.  Using a car purchase as an example, the criteria might be:  initial purchase cost, maintenance costs, gas mileage and safety features.  You would simply list your alternatives and then assess each alternative against these criteria.  Of course, some criteria might carry more weight and be required vs. optional.

This type of decision-making is particularly helpful in large, diverse groups.  Instead of advocating (arguing) for a particular decision, identify and then keep the focus on the key principles that apply.  Let the criteria guide the evaluation to build a consensus.  Choices have consequences so keep the long-term outcomes in mind when evaluating.

 

You can read more about decision making at this link.

Be Self-Aware

Self-Awareness

Knowing yourself deeply” is a key theme of this blog, mostly in the context of discovering purpose.  What do you do with this knowledge in everyday life?  The picture above shows a kitten that thinks it’s a lion.  This poor self-assessment of reality may work some of the time but likely will cause problems in communications and relationships.

Self-awareness is about knowing your strengths AND weaknesses.  It’s about how you present yourself in a simple conversation, e.g. choice and tone of words, amount of words and body language.  It’s about being in touch with your emotions (and triggers) and understanding how this affects your decisions and interactions.

Self-awareness points the way to a valuing of differences and is therefore particularly important in mentoring.  It is a prerequisite to suspending personal biases and judgement and allows empathy to prevail.  For example, I am disciplined, a morning person, goal-oriented, sometimes assertive and in a loving relationship.  I know that discipline is not a common trait.  I try not to assume that others have it and wonder what strengths they might have instead.

Personal growth requires asking for feedback which validates your assumptions.  It lets you check if your strengths offset your weaknesses.  This model by Marquita Herald shares some elements of self-awareness:

  • Self-concept: how you perceive yourself.
  • Self-regulation: taking responsibility for your choices.
  • Self-development: developing character and abilities.
  • Self-identity: recognition of one’s potential.
  • Personal values: reflect needs and wants.

There are levels and types of self-awareness which if interested, you can read about at this link.  Try this self-awareness quiz too.

Retire with Purpose

RwP

This idea of “retire with purpose” has two important parts:  defining retirement and discovering your purpose?

Retirement as defined in the dictionary is “the period of one’s life after leaving one’s job and ceasing to work”.  That doesn’t quite do it for me.  Retirement is a period of life where new time choices are possible, you may choose to work but are not burdened with the requirement to work.  For me, it also implies that we have left our life-long job or career.

What are your time choices?  We each have 168 hours per week and they will be filled.  Why not do that purposefully, deliberately and with intention.  The model above suggests that our time will be split across work, hobbies, volunteering or leisure.  We can choose tasks or relationships to fill our time or both.

Purpose is (re)discovering who you are and Mission is what you choose to do.  You answer questions such as “who am I”, “what do I want my legacy to be” or “how am I going to make the world a better place”.  Purpose will feel meaningful and joyful.  You feel called to something because that’s who you are.  It’s something you can’t stop yourself from doing.

Research shows that people with purpose live longer.  It is an important element of well-being.  Retirement is a significant shift in time choices.  You heart, mind, body and soul must be nurtured but only you know the right balance.

What Gives You a Thrill?

Thrill

Passion is a funny thing; it’s important but my informal survey indicates that it is elusive. I’ll ask some questions to get at this:

  • What gives you a thrill in life?
  • What activities make you say, “I can’t stop myself from doing it”?
  • What makes you cry or angry or laugh?
  • What makes today a great day?

Are the answers obvious to you?  I believe we owe it to ourselves to know or find our passions.  Passion might be related to a special cause or it may simply be using our gifts of talent.  At the level of “cause” it might be kids, education, politics, the environment, poverty, addictions or hundreds of other things.

I don’t think the entire day has to be perfect to make it great nor does it have to be stress-free.  Here are some examples of using your talents:

  • You close a deal on an important transaction that you worked hard at.
  • You solved a big problem (for yourself or another).
  • You share an important insight with a friend.
  • You offer comfort to another.
  • You finally get comfortable with making a big life decision.
  • You make a difference in someone’s life.

Being “in the zone” or “in the flow” occur.  We lose track of time and we are entirely focused.  We feel the energy.  We deserve these feelings.  They are characteristics of Purpose.  Pay attention.  Once you find this “magic” in your life, you owe it to yourself to live it deeply.

We Live in Our Own Small World

Small World

We live in our own small world(s).  We see the same family, friends and co-workers on a regular basis.  We watch the same news channels and TV shows most days.  We travel on the same streets in a small part of the area we live in.  We even think the same thoughts from day-to-day.  I feel I live in two worlds…my family and home life and my life as a volunteer.

We see many new people in a given day, from the cashier at the grocery store to a neighbor who is walking their dog – but we don’t get to know them.  Our “world” forms our perspective, values, life philosophy and opportunities.  Are you on auto-pilot or is this done consciously?

My corporate life enabled me to see new parts of the world; I especially liked Asia.  My retired life as a volunteer takes me into the world of poverty, recovery and hurt.  I have learned that we are more alike than different.  We have the same desires and aspirations.

Perspective change helps us grow.  How do you do that?  You change your “world” intentionally.  You take time to talk to someone and ask a deeper question…then listen.  You read on a divergent topic or change your routine to allow unexpected things to happen.  You allow random opportunities to feel like adventure rather than a distraction.  You seek to understand the worlds of another.

Uniqueness and Conformity

Uniqueness

We each have a uniqueness and specialness to our lives.  I am convinced that we are born with some (all?) of it and that it is even God-given.  Knowing it is part of the purpose journey because there is power and energy from seeing life-long patterns.  Specialness includes ways of thinking, talents, nationality and more.  The “world” (parents, school, work, society) causes us to lose it because it doesn’t want us to be too “different”.  The world doesn’t seem to like people who live outside of a framework…and so we conform (or get bullied).  Specialness must be (re)discovered.

When we are very young there are less boundaries on behavior.  But then we go to school and immediately we “must be quiet in class” or study specific topics in certain ways.  Socialization starts with our parents but becomes more obvious in a big school system or at work.  We conform and lose a little bit of ourselves, sometimes reluctantly and sometime unknowingly.  As we progress through life we assume other life roles.  Our company culture, society’s expectations for men and women and our religion are all working on us.  What is the cost to our soul?

I presume that socialization is unstoppable and even necessary.  When we are young we are not equipped to challenge these forces.  As adults we can rediscover our uniqueness.  Do you know and embrace your specialness?  Can you think of the earliest time in your life when it first became evident?